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     JCEC

     

    Student Guidelines

     

    2018-2019

     

    JACKSON COUNTY EARLY COLLEGE

    Mission

    Offer an inclusive Early College program designed to encourage students from all backgrounds and socio-economic levels to earn college credits, a degree, or a certification so they are prepared for a meaningful and successful career in the community.  

    Vision

    Jackson County Early College will provide students and parents an exceptional academic experience that promotes student success in a college environment while reducing the time and expense of a college education. 

    Goals

    • Develop a skilled workforce to meet the employment needs of Jackson County businesses.
    • Prepare students as they transition from high school to college to career.
    • Provide a quality college experience at little cost to families.
    • Improve the high school and college completion rate for Jackson County students.

     

    Design Principles of Jackson County Early College (JCEC)

    1. College- Focused Academic Program – emphasizing a career pathway.
    2. Comprehensive Student Support – helping students adjust to college life.
    3. Dynamic High School/College Partnerships – working together to benefit students.
    4. Culture of Continuous Improvement – implementing best practices.
    • Students enroll in high school and college classes – simultaneously.
    • College tuition and fees are paid by the district provided the amount of state aid generated for the courses is enough to cover the expense.
    • Students may earn an Associate’s degree, a certificate, or up to 60 transferable college credits.

    Each district has the right to determine if students are academically ready to participate in JCEC.  Students should discuss college-readiness standards in their districts with their school counselors.

    JCEC students are required to adhere to their districts’ student handbooks, as well as Jackson College’s student handbook, and the expectations outlined in this document.

    JCEC website:  www.jxncec.org

     

    Application Process

     

    Steps for application to JCEC

     

    Link to information, pre-application, and application:  www.jxncec.org

     

    1. Complete the pre-application which can be found under the “Application” tab and turn it in to your school counselor.
    2. Once your counselor has approved the pre-application, you may begin the application.

    To complete the actual application for JCEC:

     

    1. Click on the Application link under the “Application” tab. This takes you to the Jackson County student account page.
    2. If you already have applied to Jackson College, you have an account.  Use your username and password to enter the system.
    3. If you have not applied to Jackson College, select create account.  You will select a username and password.
    4. Once you have created an account, you will be directed to the Jackson College application page.  Select “Start an Application.”
    5. Select “Start a new JCEC Application.”
    6. Follow the directions and provide the required information.
    7. Once you have submitted your application, you will also be required to: Complete a brief (250-word) essay on how JCEC can benefit you; have a parent/guardian sign the “Parent Waiver” (This form is available at www.jxncec.org) ; obtain a letter of recommendation from a teacher, counselor, employer or mentor. 

     

    SUPPLEMENTAL DOCUMENTS MUST BE EMAILED TO:

    info@jxncec.org

     

    Important Phone Numbers and Contact Information

     

    Name

    Position

    Email

    Phone

    Jean Logan

    JCEC Administrator

    info@jxncec.org

     

    517-581-2003

    Freddie Deramus

    Success Navigator

    deramusfreddiel@jccmi.edu

     

    517-990-1432

    Nathan Venske

    Asst. Dean/Student Services

    venskenathan@jccmi.edu

    517-796-8499

    Jackson College Bookstore

     

    jackson@bkstr.com

    517-796-8440

    Registration & Records

     

     

    517-787-0800

    Cashier’s Office

     

    jccashier@jccmi.edu

    517-796-8420

     

    Helpful Web Links

     

    Jackson County Early College              

    www.jxncec.org

    Jackson College home page   

    https://www.jccmi.edu/

    Dual Enrollment/JCEC Information   

    https://www.jccmi.edu/admissions/admissions-high-school-students/

    Jackson College Programs of Study

    https://www.jccmi.edu/academics/programs-of-study/

    Transfer Equivalencies                           

    https://www.michigantransfernetwork.org/

    Jackson College Academic Calendars

    https://www.jccmi.edu/academics/academic-calendar/

    Jackson College – Payment Options

    https://www.jccmi.edu/financial-aid/payment-options/

     

     

    Educational Development Plan

     

    After students have completed the application and are successfully enrolled in JCEC, an educational development plan will be developed in collaboration with the student, school counselor, and Jackson College Success Navigator.  These plans are updated annually to verify a student’s progress for several reasons:

    • To determine a student will meet high school graduation requirements;
    • To monitor progress toward the student’s career pathway;
    • To prepare the student for transfer to a four-year college or university.

    Since this program is a five-year high school program, students must take a math or math-related courses in their final year to fulfill Michigan Department of Education high school graduation requirements.

    The intent of JCEC is to develop an Educational Development Plan specifically devised to support the career pathway of each student.  The college coursework that a student is able to complete depends on different variables:

    • Coordination of required high school courses needed for graduation and coursework at the postsecondary level;
    • Commitment and responsibility toward college coursework;
    • Time-management capabilities.

    Students have three options in the Early College program:

    1. Earn up to 60 transferable credits;
    2. Earn a certificate;
    3. Earn an Associate’s degree.

     

    Academic Achievement

    In order to maintain academic expectations set by the JCEC program, students will adhere to the academic achievement expectations which are intended to keep the focus on education as students take coursework at post-secondary institutions as well as their local high school.  Failure to meet academic expectations will result in probationary action and possible dismissal from the JCEC program.

    Academic Achievement Expectations

    As the JCEC program is an academic-based program, the student’s home school, Jackson College, and parents are committed to the academic success of the student.  Therefore, the following guidelines have been established. These actions may be taken should the student’s grade point average fall to an unacceptable level.

    Before a student will be enrolled in any Early College course, signatures will be required from:

    1. The student
    2. The student’s parent/guardian
    3. The high school counselor

    It is expected that the student will maintain a GPA of 2.0 or higher (this means a letter grade of “C” or higher) through the entirety of this program in all classes (high school and college) associated with the JCEC program.

     

    Level 1:  In the event the student’s GPA falls below 2.0 at any point during the semester/trimester, the student will be placed on academic probation for a period of three (3) weeks.  While on academic probation, the student will be placed into a tutoring program.  At the end of the probationary period the student’s grades will be reassessed and if the student’s GPA has improved to 2.0 or higher he/she will be removed from probation.

     

    Level 2:  A student who is on academic probation, and whose grades do not improve to 2.0 or higher during the three (3) week probationary period, will remain on academic probation and will remain in a tutoring program for the remainder of the semester/trimester.  At the end of the semester/trimester, the student’s grades will be evaluated and if the student’s GPA is 2.0 or higher they will be removed from probation.

     

    Level 3:  A student whose GPA does not improve to at least 2.0 during the semester/trimester may be dismissed from the JCEC program and is subject to the terms of the reimbursement agreement between the student and the his/her local district.

     

    College Class Failure Notice:  A student who fails one (1) college class may be required to repay the local school district for his/her portion of the course cost depending upon the district’s guidelines.  Should a second college class be failed, the student will be required to repay the school district, and the student shall be dismissed from the JCEC program.

     

    These expectations are not intended to be punitive in nature.  Each incident will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.  Students having trouble in maintaining acceptable grades are strongly encouraged to seek assistance from the Early College Administrator, Success Navigators, parents, instructors, counselors, tutors, employers, etc., to avoid probation.

     

    Opting Out of Early College

     If a student determines Jackson County Early College is not the appropriate pathway, he/she must submit an “Opt-Out” form to the Early College Administrator.  The form will require signatures from the student, the student’s parent/guardian, high school counselor, and Early College Administrator.  This form is located in the appendix.

     

     JCEC Focuses on Success

    Student success is the primary focus of the JCEC program.  However, when expectations are not being met, dismissal from the program may occur.  Possible ways to be dismissed from the JCEC program:

    1. Academic Achievement expectations are not being met.
    2. Student discipline issues at Jackson College or at the local district are occurring.

    An intervention plan may be implemented for students who are struggling to meet the expectations of Jackson County Early College.

     

    Course Materials/Textbooks

    The cost of course materials and textbooks may be paid by a student’s school district.  Students should check with the school counselor for expenses paid by the district and the process for obtaining materials and textbooks.

     

    Final Year – Math or Math-Related Course

    All students are required to enroll in a math or math-related course during their final year.  Each district has courses that satisfy this requirement.  Jackson College also offers courses that will fulfill this stipulation. Math and math-related courses offered by Jackson College are located in the appendix.

     

    Earning College Credit Through Advanced Placement

    College credit may be granted to students who have received a qualifying score on an associated Advanced Placement test.

    To receive credit for AP exams/scores requires that student exams and scores appear on an official high school transcript or that the student submit an official AP Score Sheet. The official AP Score Sheet should be sent to:

    JC Office of the Registrar
    Jackson College
    2111 Emmons Road
    Jackson, MI 49201

    If you need to request your AP test score sheet, simply write
    Advanced Placement, Box 977-IS
    Princeton, New Jersey 08541
    Or call: 609-771-7600

     

    Jackson College

    College Board Advanced Placement Program

    AP Subject

    Score

    Credit

    JC Course

    United States History

    5, 4, 3

    6 credits

    HIS 231, 232

    2, 1

    no credit

     

    Art History

    5, 4

    6 credits

    ART 111, 112

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Studio Art: 2-D Design

    5, 4

    3 credits

    ART 101

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Studio Art: Drawing

    5, 4

    3 credits

    ART 103

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Biology

    5, 4

    8 credits

    BIO 161, BIO 162

    3

    4 credits

    BIO 161

    2, 1

    no credit

     

    Calculus AB

    5, 4, 3

    4 credits

    MTH 151

    2, 1

    no credit

     

    Calculus BC

    5, 4, 3

    9 credits

    MTH 151, 154

    2, 1

    no credit

     

    Chemistry (only)

    5, 4

    8 credits

    CEM 141, 142

    3

    4 credits

    CEM 131 or 141

    2, 1

    no credit

     

    Computer Science A (only)

    5, 4

    2 credits

    General CPS credit

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Computer Science AB (only)

    5

    5 credits

    General CPS credit/waive CPS 175

    4

    2 credits

    General CPS credit

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Environmental Science

    5, 4, 3

    4 credits

    BIO 158

    2, 1

    no credit

     

    Microeconomics

    5, 4

    3 credits

    ECN 232

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Macroeconomics

    5, 4

    3 credits

    ECN 231

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    English Language and Composition

    5, 4

    3 credits

    ENG 131

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    French Language

    5

    8 credits

    FRN 231, 232

    4

    4 credits

    FRN 231

    3, 2, 1

    No credit

     

    German Language

    5

    8 credits

    GER 231, 232

    4

    4 credits

    GER 231

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Government and Politics: United States

    5, 4

    3 credits

    PLS 141

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Government and Politics: Comparative

    5, 4

    3 credits

    PLS 141

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Physics “C” Mechanics

    5, 4

    4 credits

    PHY 251

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Physics “C” Electricity & Magnetism

    5, 4

    4 credits

    PHY 252

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Physics “B”

    5, 4

    8 credits

    PHY 231, 232

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Psychology

    5, 4

    4 credits

    PSY 140

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Statistics

    5, 4

    4 credits

    MAT 133

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

    Spanish Language

    5

    8 credits

    SPN 231, 232

    4

    4 credits

    SPN 231

    3, 2, 1

    no credit

     

     

    Educational Support Services

    Jackson County Early College and Jackson College provide services for students to support their academic success as they transition from high school to college.  Specifically for Early College students, the following supports are included in the program:

     

    1. Study Clubs for students in comparable classes to meet for peer tutoring.
    2. Advisory Groups to help students navigate the college experience – the hows, what, wheres, whens, and whys of being a college student.
    3. Mentors for Early College students including the Early College Administrator and Success Navigator dedicated solely to the Early College.
    4. College placement test prep to help students successfully meet the benchmarks for college entrance, including test-taking tips.
    5. College/Career-Readiness activities designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond.  
    6. Prior to beginning college classes, Early College students will participate in a Summer Bridge Bootcamp. During camp, students will review the expectations for Early College, learn success strategies for college students, tour the facilities and amenities, and discover the “how-tos” – how to find people/departments, purchase materials at the bookstore, read their schedule, and find their classes.
    7. “Beyond JCEC” will teach students how to complete college applications, transfer to another college, complete financial aid, and write resumes.
    8. Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) trains educators to use proven practices in order to prepare students for success in high school, college, and a career, especially students traditionally underrepresentedin higher education. AVID brings proven practices and curriculum to educational institutions.
    9. Supporting Parents of Early College Students. Informational meetings with parents of EC students before entrance to Early College, During Early College, and upon exit from the program.  Training and resources will be provided to help parents help their students be successful college students.
    10. Personalized Career Planning & Advising. Each student will be assigned a Success Navigator who has the responsibility for monitoring a student’s progress, career pathway, and educational intent upon exit from Early College.  The Success Navigator will collaborate with his/her assigned students to ensure that the students are enrolled in courses that support future educational/career plans.

     

    The Role of the School Counselor

    Early College students will meet with their high school counselors for guidance from 9th grade through 12th grade in collaboration with the designated Success Navigator and Early College Administrator.  In the 13th year, the Early College Administrator and Success Navigator become the primary academic support.  The school counselor and Success Navigator work with each student to develop the 5-year Educational Development Plan and revise it at least annually.  The EDP guides course selection in Early College as well as progress toward high school graduation.  The school counselor’s and Success Navigator’s roles are to transition students from high school to college by monitoring progress, developing appropriate schedules, and supporting students in a variety of ways.

     

    Student Success Navigator

    The Student Success Navigator will be a critical mentor in planning college coursework in collaboration with the school counselor.  The Navigator meets with students beginning with the application process and will be deeply involved in the creation of the Educational Development Plan and advising students on appropriate college courses for the intended career pathway.  The Navigator will also coach students on transfer options for other colleges and universities.

     

    The Early College Administrator

    The Early College Administrator (ECA) will serve as a mentor in the program and will support the student through each step of Early College. The ECA will monitor student progress in coursework and provide opportunities in college and career readiness.  The ECA also works closely with staff in the local districts to coordinate services for students.

    Students will be required to maintain frequent contact with Early College  Administrator through a variety of ways, including consultation, email, and phone. 

    The Early College Administrator will also provide college/career-readiness sessions throughout the year.  Students are required to participate.

     

    Appendix

     

     

                Contents:

     

                            Forms

                                        Pre-Application

                                        Parent Waiver

                                        Opt-Out Form

     

     

                            Course Information

                                        Michigan Transfer Agreement

                                        Math/Math-Related courses offered at Jackson College

                                        Link to Jackson College’s complete catalog:

                                                    https://www.jccmi.edu/wp-content/uploads/Catalog-2018-2019.pdf

     

    PRE-APPLICATION

     

     PreApp

     

     

     

    PARENT WAIVER

     

     Parent Waiver

     

     

     

    OPT-OUT FORM

     

     Opt Out

     

     

     

    Michigan Transfer Agreement

     

    The Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (MACRAO) Articulation Agreement facilitates the transfer of students from community colleges to four-year colleges and universities in Michigan. By carefully choosing courses, students may obtain an associate degree from Jackson College and complete the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA). However, students do not need to obtain a degree to earn the MTA designation. If students meet all the requirements of the agreement, they should contact the Registration & Records Office and request the MTA designation on their transcripts.

    More information can be found at http://www.macrao.org/ Publications/MTA.asp

     

    Requirements of the Michigan Transfer Agreement

    • Minimum 30 credits
    • Minimum grade 2.0 for each course

    Note: This list reflects only current courses. The Registrar’s Office maintains a historical listing of courses that are accepted as part of MTA.

     

    TAKE 30 CREDITS FROM:

    ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATIONS

    (2 courses, 1 of which must be Composition)

    English (ENG) 131, 132, 201*, 232

    Communications (COM) 231, 240, 250

    *Please note: ENG 201 Advanced Composition (3 credits) is a by-invitation-only English course that may be substituted for ENG 132.

     

    QUANTITATIVE REASONING

    (at least 1 course)

    Mathematics (MAT) 130, 133, 135, 139, 141, 151, 154, 251, 254

     

    NATURAL SCIENCE

    (at least 2 courses from two disciplines; 1 must be laboratory science) Courses that are not lab science are marked with an *.

    Biology (BIO) 110, 132, 140*, 158, 161, 162, 220, 231, 232, 253, 254

    Chemistry (CEM) 131, 132, 141, 142

    Geology (GEL) 109, 160 Natural Science (NSC) 131

    Physics (PHY) 131, 150*, 151, 231, 232, 251, 252

     

    SOCIAL SCIENCE

    (at least 2 courses from two disciplines)

    Anthropology (ANT) 131

    Criminal Justice (CRJ) 111, 117

    Economics (ECN) 231, 232

    Geography (GEO) 131, 132

    History (HIS) 211, 231, 232, 235

    Psychology (PSY) 140, 152, 245, 251, 252, 290

    Political Science (PLS) 141

    Sociology (SOC) 117, 152, 231, 236, 246

     

    HUMANITIES

    (at least 2 courses from two disciplines)

    Art (ART) 111, 112

    English (ENG) 210, 236, 246, 247, 249, 252, 254, 255, 256, 257

    French (FRN) 131, 132

    German (GER) 131, 132

    History (HIS) 120, 131, 132

    Humanities (HUM) 131

    Music (MUS) 130, 131, 132, 151, 152

    Philosophy (PHL) 231, 232, 243

    Spanish (SPN) 131, 132, 231, 232

    Theatre (THR) 116

     

    MATH/MATH-RELATED COURSES FOR JCEC STUDENTS

     

    Course

    Title

    Prerequisite (Math Related)

    Course Description

    ACC 214

    Income Tax Accounting

    MAT-030 or Higher

    The student will learn current tax laws and how to
    apply them by preparing complex tax returns on the
    appropriate IRS forms. Both individual and small
    business tax returns will be studied and prepared.
    The student will have the choice of preparing the
    returns manually and/or using a popular tax
    software package.

    ACC 216

    Financial Accounting Concepts

    MAT 030 or Higher

    This course is designed for the non-accounting
    supervisor/manager who must have an understanding
    of financial and managerial accounting as it is
    used in decision making. Learn about annual
    reports, financial statements, balance sheet
    accounts and accounting transactions. Focus on how
    accounting information is used in decision making
    and not on the mechanics behind that accounting
    information. This is an introductory accounting
    course required for some BUS,CIS and HOC programs.
    Students should consider their academic program
    and select either ACC 216 or ACC 231 for their
    introductory accounting course.

    ACC 231

    Principles of Accounting

    MAT 033 or Higher

    This course is an introductory course in
    Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and
    practice of recording financial accounting data
    and preparation of financial statements in
    accordance with Generally Accepted accounting
    Principles (GAAP)with an emphasis on
    coprorations. Current software and online
    applications will be utilized.

    ACC 232

    Principles of Accounting II

    ACC 231 / MAT 033

    This course is an introductory course in
    Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting
    impacts managerial decision making. Topcis
    include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost
    accounting, break-even analysis, differential
    analysis, financial statements and budgeting.
    Current software and online applications will be
    utilized.

    ACC 234

    Managerial Accounting

    ACC 232

    Management level professionals from all
    disciplines will be faced with complex situations
    and decisions. Appropriate managerial accounting
    reports and critical thinking skills are crucial
    to a pro-active management process. Learn about
    financial statement analysis, cash flow
    forecasting, job order costing in manufacturing,
    process costing in manufacturing, activity based
    costing in manufacturing, cost-volume analysis,
    cost behavior analysis, budgeting, responsibility
    accounting, case study analysis, critical thinking
    and decision making skills. Prerequisite: ACC 232

    ACC 240

    Intermediate Accounting

    ACC 231

    Professional accountants must have a solid
    background in GAAP financial accounting concepts.
    Review and expand your knowledge of accounting
    theory and processes, nature and content of the
    balance sheet and income statement, present value
    tables and their application, currently
    applicableGenerally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and recent Financial Accounting Standards Board
    (FASB) pronouncements. Prerequisite: ACC 231

    BUA 111

    Personal Finance

    CIS-095 / ENG 091

    Provides a fundamental knowledge of financial
    concerns including financial services, stocks,
    bonds, budgeting, insurance, real estate, estate
    and tax planning, buying on credit, borrowing,
    saving, investing intelligently, and retirement.
    Analysis of personal objectives to financial
    planning will be discussed and put into practice.

    CEM 131

    Fundamentals of Chemistry

    ENG-085 / MAT 033 or Higher

    Fills requirement for some non-science majors.
    Provides background for CEM 141 for those with
    no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental
    principles of chemistry such as states of matter,
    simple atomic and molecular structure, and the
    periodic classification of elements. The study of
    water emphasizes the properties of solutions and
    acid-base relations.Course includess a laboratory
    component.Course includes a laboratory component.

    CEM 132

    Fundamentals of Organic & Biological Chemistry

    CEM 131

    This course is an extension of material covered
    in CEM 131. It is required in many Bachelor's
    degree programs, including nursing. Organic topics
    include the structure, physical properties and
    chemical behavior of the major classes of organic
    compounds. The structure, functions, formation and
    reactions of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and
    nucleic acids are covered, including enzymes,
    chemical messengers, and biochemical energy
    production.Course includes a laboratory component.

    CEM 141

    General Chemistry I

    ENG 091 / MAT 130 or Higher

    This course is required for most sciences,
    engineering, and pre-professional health majors.
    Students who are required to take organic
    chemistry for their major should enroll in
    CEM 141 during their first semester. Topics
    include atomic and molecular structure,
    periodicity, chemical bonding, states of matter,
    kinetic molecular theory and stoichiometry.
    Recommendation: Recent algebra success.Course
    includes a laboratory component.Course includes a
    laboratory component.
    Replaces CEM 151.

    CEM 142

    General Chemistry II

    CEM 141

    This course is the second semester of general
    chemistry and extends material covered in
    CEM 141. Covered concepts include chemical
    thermodynamics, electrochemical reactions,
    reaction kinetics, acid-base theories, nuclear
    chemistry, and aqueous solutions with emphasis
    on equilibrium. Experiments include quantitative
    methods, stoichiometry, colorimetry, and
    gravimetric analysis.Course includes a laboratory
    component. Replaces CEM 152.

    CEM 241

    Organic Chemistry I

    CEM 142

    A comprehensive study of the major classes of
    organic compounds, their structures and reactions.
    The sterochemical properties and spectra (IR and
    NMR) of molecules and their mechanisms of
    reactions are stressed. The laboratory experiments
    demonstrate techniques used in organic reactions,
    syntheses illustrating types of reactions,
    analyses of major classes of compounds and
    kinetic studies.Course includes a laboratory
    component.

    CEM 242

    Organic Chemistry II

    CEM 241

    Continuation of CEM 241 - Contains Lab component

    ECM 101

    Ecommerce Fundamentals

    CIS 095 / ENG 091 / MAT 030 or Higher

    The course introduces revenue models for
    conducting business transactions globally with
    customers over the Internet. Topics include
    integrating e-business strategies with traditional
    storefront objectives, procuring hardware and
    software resources, optimizing web marketing
    opportunities, and complying with legal, ethical
    and regulatory restrictions.  Student will apply
    concepts to real-life scenarios through
    active-learning strategies

    ECN 231

    Macroeconomics

    ENG 085 / ENG 091 / MAT 130 or Higher

    Covers macroeconomics.  Explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and
    fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ECN 232

    Microeconomics

    ENG 085 / ENG 091 / MAT 130 or Higher

    Concerns micro-economics, the market structure of
    firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor
    markets and unions, how income is distributed,
    current economic problems, international
    economics, and alternative economic systems.

    HOC 140

    Pharmacy Technician Concepts & Calculations

    MAT 130 or Higher

    This course applies mathematics in the
    calculations required for determination of proper
    dosages, conversion operations, as well as
    preparation skills of parenteral solutions for
    injections, IVs, etc.  Detailed instruction in the
    techniques used in dosage preparation and aseptic
    techniques will be demonstrated.  Topics covered
    will include pharmaceutical and medical terms,
    abbreviations, and symbols commonly used in the
    prescribing, dispensing, charting medications,
    drug purchasing and inventory control concepts.
    This course will provide direction to students for
    Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB
    Exam) preparation.

    MAT 030

    Foundation of Math

     

    This course is designed to prepare non-STEM major
    students for MAT 130, Quantitative Reasoning.
    Cultivates student skills in interpreting,
    understanding, and using quantitative
    information. Develops facility with numeracy,
    problem, solving strategies, proportional and
    statistical reasoning through a quantitative
    literacy lens. Fosters skills in reading and
    writing quantitative information. Emphasizes
    critical thinking and the use of multiple
    strategies in applied contexts.

    MAT 033

    Algebra for Stats

     

    As an alternative pathway toward college-level
    mathematics, this course introduces fundamental
    algebra concepts within an underlying framework of
    statistics and mathematical modeling based on
    real-world data. Major concepts and themes
    include: problem solving and experimental design;
    unit analysis and error in measurement;
    dimensional analysis and scientific notation;
    representing data and coordinate graphing;
    introduction to basic descriptive statistics and
    probability theorems; basic geometric principles
    (area, volume, perimeter); arithmetic operations
    on numbers, ratios, summations, and percents;
    solution and manipulation of formulas; modeling
    relationships (linear and exponential regression);
    solving equations and inequalities; and function
    arithmetic and graphing. Appropriate technology
    includes a graphing calculator. The mathematics
    department recommends that the prerequisite not be
    more than two years old. If the prerequisite is
    more than two years old, then the recommendation
    is that the course placement exam be taken or the
    prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of
    the student.

    MAT 039

    Beginning Algebra

    Placement Exam

    Students will build algebraic skills working with
    linear and quadratic expressions and equations.
    The course particularly emphasizes graphs and
    equations of lines, factoring techniques, and
    methods of solving quadratic equations.
    The mathematics department recommends that the
    prerequisite not be more than two years old. If
    the prerequisite is more than two years old, then
    the recommendation is that the course placement
    exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to
    ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 040

    Quantitative Reasoning Fundamentals

     

    Quantitiative Reasoning Fundamentals provides
    extra support for students concurrently enrolled
    in MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning. The course
    will review mathematical topics needed to be
    successful in MAT 130, and will offer students
    the opportunity to review, ask questions, and
    receive extra help with the content of MAT 130.

    MAT 130

    Quantitative Reasoning

    MAT 030 or 040

    Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in
    analyzing, synthesizing and communicating
    quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic
    reasoning and modeling skills through a
    quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical
    thinking and ane the use of multiple strategies in
    applied contexts. Topics include proportional and
    statistical reasoning, probability, and
    evaluation of bias and validity.

    MAT 131

    Intermediate Algebra

    MAT 039 or 130

    This course emphasizes simplifying expressions,
    solving equations, and graphing functions,
    including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational,
    radical, exponential and logarithmic. Problem
    solving and mathematical modeling are integrated
    throughout. Appropriate technology includes a
    graphing calculator. The mathematics department
    recommends the pre-requisite not be more than two
    years old. If the pre-requisite is more than two
    years old the recommendation is the course
    placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite
    be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 133

    Introduction to Probability & Statistics

    MAT 033 or MAT 130

    This course is an introduction to experimental
    design, data representation, basic descriptive
    statistics, probability theorems, frequency
    distributions and functions, binomial and normal
    probability distributions and functions,
    probability density functions, hypothesis testing,
    statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear
    regression, correlation and application of the
    above in making informed, data driven decisions in
    real-world contests. Both graphing calculators and
    computer-based statistical software (MS Excel)
    will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two
    years old, then the mathematics department
    recommends the course placement exam be taken or
    the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success
    of the student.

    MAT 135

    Finite Mathematics

    MAT 039 or 131

    This course is for student whose programs do not
    require trigonometry (or the Calculus sequence).
    The topics included are linear, exponential,
    quadratic, polynomial and logarithmic functions
    and models: systems of linear equations; linear
    regression; mathematics of finance and financial
    modeling; matrices, linear programming;
    permutations; combinations, probability theory;
    probabilistic simulations; decision theory;
    descriptive statistics; and Markov chains. The
    mathematics department recommends the
    pre-requisite not be more than two years old. If
    the pre-requisite is more than two years old the
    recommendation is the course placement assessment
    be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure
    the success of the student.

    MAT 139

    College Algebra

    MAT 039 or MAT 131

    Algebraic functions, graphs and models are
    addressed.  Emphasis is placed on the following
    function types: polynomial, exponential,
    logarithmic, rational and radical.  In all topic
    areas, covered content includes simplifying
    expressions, solving equations, graphing using
    transformations, mathematical modeling and
    problem solving.

    MAT 141

    Precalculus

    MAT 139

    This course's major emphasis is on the concept
    functions. Study polynomial, rational exponential,
    logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse
    trigonometric functions, their properties, graphs
    and related equations and applications. Additional
    topics include systems of equations, matrices and
    conic sections. A graphing calculator is required
    and used extensively. The mathematics department
    recommends the pre-requisite not be more than two
    years old. If the pre-requisite is more than two
    years old, the recommendation is the course
    placement exam be taken or the pre-requisite be
    retaken to ensure the success of the student

    MAT 151

    Calculus I

    MAT 141

    First calculus course for business, mathematics,
    engineering and science students explores
    introductory plane analytic geometry, the
    derivative, the integral and their applications
    for algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and
    logarithmic functions.  The mathematics
    department recommends that the prerequisite not
    be more than two years old.  If the prerequisite
    is more than two years old, then the
    recommendation is that the course placement exam
    should be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to
    ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 154

    Calculus II

    MAT 151

    This course explores the following topics: methods
    and applications of the derivative and integral
    for inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic
    functions, indeterminate forms, series and
    polar/parametric representation of functions.
    Graphing calculator required. The mathematics
    department recommends the pre-requisite not be
    more than two years old. If the pre-requisite is
    more than two years old, the recommendation is the
    course placement exam be taken or the
    pre-requisite be retaken to ensure the success of
    the student

    MAT 210

    Foundations of Mathematics

    MAT 131 or Higher

    This course provides background material for
    students preparing to teach at the elementary
    level and emphasizes the structure and properties
    of the number system. It also covers concepts,
    models in algorithms for whole numbers, integers,
    fractions, decimals and percents. Some additional
    hours of on-site field work may be required. The
    mathematics department recommends that the
    prerequisite not be more than two years old. If
    the prerequisite is more than two years old the
    recommendation is the course placement exam be
    taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the
    success of the student.

    MAT 211

    Foundation of Mathematics II

    MAT 210

    This course will provide the second semester of
    math content for elementary education majors. It
    is a continuation course for MAT 210, Foundations
    of Mathematics I. Topics include probability and
    statistics, geometry and measurement. The
    mathematics department recommends that the
    prerequisite not be more than two years old. If
    the prerequisite is more than two years old then
    the recommendation is that the course placement
    exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to
    ensure the success of the student

    MAT 251

    Calculus III

    MAT 154

    Solid analytical geometry is integrated thought
    this course covering the calculus of vector valued
    functions, multivariable functions, and vector
    fields with applications. Graphing calculator
    required. The mathematics department recommends
    that the prerequisite not be more than two years
    old. If the prerequisite is more than two years
    old then the recommendation is that the course
    placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be
    retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 254

    Differential Equations

    MAT 154

    Explore solutions of first order differential
    equations, linear differential equations with
    constant coefficients, variation of parameters,
    series solutions, Laplace transforms, eigenvectors
    and eigenvalues and application to solution of
    systems of linear first order equations. Graphing
    calculator required. The mathematics department
    recommends that the prerequisite not be more than
    two years old. If the prerequisite is more than
    two years old then the recommendation is that the
    course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite
    be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    NRS 116

    Pharmacology

    MAT 133 / BIO 132

    This course introduces students to basic
    principles of drug actions and nursing
    implications within the framework of the nursing
    process. Students will develop clinical reasoning
    and drug computation skills necessary to safely
    administer medications in a cultrually responsive,
    client-centered manner.

    PHY 131

    Conceptual Physics

    ENG 085 / MAT 030 or Higher

    Become familiar with basic concepts used in
    physics to describe and explain various physical
    phenomena. The course covers the following topics:
    kinematics (the description of motion); mechanics
    (the study of force, momentum, and energy); the
    behavior of solids, liquids and gases; temperature
    and heat; waves and sound; electricity and
    magnetism; and optics. The course is designed to
    familiarize the student with the basics of physics
    using a minimum of mathematics.Course includes a
    laboratory component.Course includes a laboratory
    component.

    PHY 150

    Concepts in Astronomy

    ENG 085 / MAT 033 or Higher

    A one semester conceptual astronomy course for
    non-science majors.  This is a survey course that
    focuses on four broad content categories:  the
    motions of the sky, the solar system, light &
    stars, and the universe.  The emphasis of the
    course is on critical thinking about specific
    topics in these categories with a minimum of
    mathematics.  There is no laboratory component.

    PHY 151

    Astronomy

    ENG 085 / MAT 033 or Higher

    A one semester conceptual Astronomy course for
    non-science majors. This is a survey course that
    focuses on four broad content categories: motions
    of the sky, the solar system, light and stars, and
    the universe. The emphasis of the course is on
    critical thinking about specific topics in these
    categories. The course has an associated
    laboratory in which students run experiments to
    verify the concepts presented. The mathematical
    skills necessary for this course include working
    with ratios, rates, scaling, unit conversion,
    percentages, exponents, graphing, basic geometry
    and substitution into formulas.

    PHY 231

    College Physics I

    MAT 131 or Higher

    Students who are pre-professional and engineering
    technology students explore kinematics, mechanics,
    dynamics, thermodynamics, acoustics, and general
    wave motion. Course includes a laboratory
    component.

    PHY 232

    College Physics II

    PHY 231

    Students cover topics in electricity, magnetism,
    and modern physics. A continuation of PHY 231.
    Course includes a laboratory component.

    PHY 251

    Modern University Physics

    MAT 151 or Higher

    Students cover classical mechanics,
    thermodynamics, and wave motion. This course
    should be elected by all science and engineering
    students

    PHY 252

    Modern University Physics II

    PHY 251

    Students cover topics in classical electricity and
    magnetism, optics, special relativity, and modern
    physics. A continuation of PHY 251.

    PSY 144

    Introduction to Probability & Statistics for Behavioral Research

    MAT 033 / MAT 130 or Higher

    This course is an introduction to experimental
    design, data representation, basic descriptive
    statistics, probability theorems, frequency
    distributions and functions, binomial and normal
    probability distributions and functions,
    probability density functions, hypothesis
    testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis,
    linear regression, correlation and application of the
    above in making informed, data driven decisions
    in real-world contests. Both graphing calculators
    and computer-based statistical software (MS Excel)
    will be used.

     

    It is the policy of the Jackson County Intermediate School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, sex (including sexual orientation and transgender identity), marital status, height, weight or disability in its educational programs, activities or employment as required by federal laws (Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or Title IX of the Educational Amendment of 1972) and state law (Michigan Persons with Disabilities Civil Rights Act and Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act).  In addition, arrangements can be made to ensure that the lack of English speaking skills is not a barrier to admission or participation.  Board policies related to discrimination may be reviewed on our website:  www.jcisd.org or www.neola.com/jacksonisd-mi/.  Designated coordinators are the Human Resources Director, Kratz Education Center; the Principal of the Jackson Area Career Center; and the Principal of the Torrant Center and Kit Young Centers.  Contact Information:  JCISD Title IX Coordinator, 6700 Browns Lake Road, Jackson, MI 49201; Phone 517-768-5200; Fax 517-768-5296; TDD – Hearing Impaired 800-356-3232.

     

    For further information, you may also contact:  Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Superior Avenue East, Suite 750, Cleveland, OH 44114-2611; Phone 216-522-4970; Fax 216-522-2573; TDD – 877-521-2172.  E-mail:  OCR.Cleveland@ed.gov